Here‘s The Reason Why Some People Can Roll Their Tongues And Others Can‘t

It’s amazing how resilient some myths can be. We all know that the conventional wisdom isn’t always true, but you’d think that an old myth would be replaced right away once we hear how things really are. Sadly, the world doesn’t always work so neatly since not everyone gets to hear the message at once.

So sometimes we can have cases where a common belief has been debunked for years, yet it still finds a way to resurface again. For instance, has anyone ever scolded you for cracking your knuckles? They might warn you that doing this puts you at risk of arthritis but studies have been showing no link between the two since 1975.

Other cases don’t really point to any danger but still manage to get a very basic aspect of our bodies wrong. Today, we can finally put one of those myths to bed.

It starts with a simple question: Can you roll your tongue?

COMMENT and tell us about all the neat body tricks you can do.

For most of you, the question seems like a no-brainer.

You can obviously show if you can roll your tongue, but even those who can’t do it likely won’t give the question much thought.

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via Good Housekeeping | Getty Images

After all, you can’t roll your tongue if your family members can’t, right?

We’ve been taught that our parents pass down this ability as simply as they do eye color. In my case, it would be no surprise that I can roll my tongue because my dad can do it too.

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via My Kids’ Adventures

A lot of us might not think about it but this belief can be a real problem for some kids.

When their parents can’t roll their tongues but they can, they may start to worry that these people aren’t really their parents.

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via Club 93.7 | NBC

Fortunately, those frustrated tongue rollers don’t have to worry.

It turns out you don’t actually inherit this trait directly from your parents. Plus there’s some good news if you’ve always wanted to roll your tongue but haven’t been able to.

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via Twitter / @SydneyKScience

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